Since the 18th century, people have collected rock and minerals. What were their reasons for collecting?

Curated by student intern Guey-Mei Hsu, this display looks at three geology collections and their different makers and functions.

How do we define a ‘scientific instrument’ and ‘science’? Did they mean the same thing as they do today for people from different eras and places? The term ‘scientific instrument’ was only adopted in the 19th century. Most people would consider microscopes and telescopes scientific instruments but what about a radio or a calculator?

Visit the Polar Museum and try out our re-launched interactive Arctic Ice Exhibit. Spin the wheel to discover how Arctic ice cover has changed over the last century. Learn how we sense temperature with one of our self-led activity boxes.

For all ages. Drop-in any time

Part of the Cambridge Zero Festival.

Visit the Polar Museum and try out our re-launched interactive Arctic Ice Exhibit. Spin the wheel to discover how Arctic ice cover has changed over the last century. Learn how we sense temperature with one of our self-led activity boxes.

For all ages. Drop-in any time

Part of the Cambridge Zero Festival.

A jaw dropping show…
Everything that’s beautiful about American art is in Howardena Pindell’s abstract canvases from the 1970s.

There are many famous women in the history of science: Rosalind Franklin, Marie Skłodowska Curie, Caroline Herschel, and numerous others, about whom we are learning more all the time. Less well known are the ‘craftswomen’ who made instruments for measuring, modelling and investigating the world.

This new exhibition is the first of its kind to examine the interplay between money, power and dissent over the last 200 years – with a key strand of the show exploring the role of the individual in protesting for rights and representation.

From the radicals of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, like Thomas Spence and the Suffragettes, to current artists and activists, such as Aida Wilde and Hilary Powell, the works on display show how money has been used to promote social and economic equality or satirise those in power.

Artist Kaitlin Ferguson is mid-way through her CoLAB residency. Drop in and see how things are progressing, what thoughts and reflections other visitors to CoLAB have shared and what has been created so far.

Artist Kaitlin Ferguson has transformed the Clore Learning Studio into a creative research lab and would love for you to join her. You will learn new art techniques and skills and explore new ways of creative thinking in a safe and supported space.

Drop in anytime during the day to explore CoLAB and get stuck into a fun activity exploring ideas about accessibility and academic research in the city.

Activities are FREE and open to all

FREE, drop in

Join us in the Clore Learning Studio for the launch of CoLAB

FREE, everyone welcome, drop-in

About CoLAB

This event is part of our summer programme, CoLAB. CoLAB brings together our local community, an artist, and researchers at the University of Cambridge to think creatively and have fun. As a group, you will creatively explore and assist research that is currently underway at the University, and everyone is invited to join in.

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