Find out more about the objects and habits that the Romans introduced to Britain. 

In this activity you can find out about "Romanisation",  the process through which Britain became more Roman.

Download the activity here.

Learn more about the niece of the Emperor Augustus, Antonia Minor. Using useful prompts and a planner, imagine a day in her life. 

Download the activity here.

Which emperor's statue was thrown into a river in England? Which Roman invaded Britain first? Which emperor loved to sing? Find out in this activity. 

See busts of Julius Caesar, Claudius, Nero and Hadrian from the Museum's collection and find out more about each one. Discover how they are connected to the history of Britain, and complete the activities to learn more.

Download the activity here (PDF)

Which combination of heroes' qualities would you choose? Perhaps the strength of Hercules with the inventiveness of Daedalus?

Learn about mythical heroes and gods then follow the instructions to create your own heroes and heroines.

Download the activity here (pdf)

Download the activity here (Word)

You can still enjoy learning with the Museum of Classical Archaeology, even if you are not able to visit in person. 

With this selection of downloadable learning resources, you can learn about the Ancient Greeks wherever you are. 

Do you want to know how archaeologists know what they know?  This activity will help you think more carefully and learn important observational skills. 

Download the activity here.

It is really unusual for a palaeontologist (scientist who study fossils) to find a complete skeleton with all the bones in the right place. We are more likely to find only a few bones or a jumbled up skeleton.

Putting a skeleton back to together when you know what the animal looks like can be a challenge, but imagine how hard that becomes when there are no more of those creatures alive for you look at. It is a bit like trying to put a jigsaw puzzle together when you don’t have the photo on the box as a guide.

It is really unusual for a palaeontologist (scientist who study fossils) to find a complete skeleton with all the bones in the right place. We are more likely to find only a few bones or a jumbled up skeleton.

Putting a skeleton back to together when you know what the animal looks like can be a challenge, but imagine how hard that becomes when there are no more of those creatures alive for you look at. It is a bit like trying to put a jigsaw puzzle together when you don’t have the photo on the box as a guide.

Join artist Kaitlin Ferguson as she looks at a Bronze age beaker from the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Learn how to use model magic and foam shapes to create your own designs.

Find out more about how Bronze Age items were made in this short film

Join artist Kaitlin Ferguson as she looks at a globe with animals on it, from the Whipple Museum. Learn how to make your own globe at home and imagine what animal you would be.

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