The Fitzwilliam Museum has real Tudor armour in its collection. Create your own 'knight' at the museum with this easy to create, cut-and-colour diorama. 

Download the activity here.

The Ancient Romans did not have electricity. They used candles, torches and oil lamps made out of clay to see in the dark. This activity gives you lots of ideas of how you can recreate an evening without electric lights.

Download the activity here.

This kit contains all the material you will need to make paint using pigments and a medium just as artists did (before ready-mix paint!). You can construct an experiment for students to explore the role of science in both the artist’s and the scientist’s workshop with reference to the technical analysis of the Renaissance painting, Cupid and Psyche by Jacopo del Sellaio. There is material provided with the kit that supports each of the suggested activities below.

Suggested activities

Online session format

  • scheduled for 30, 45 or 60 minutes depending on your preference
  • led by a museum teacher and involves close-looking at objects and games
  • similar content to our onsite session

Sessions:

Primary

KS1

Stories in Art: Words and Pictures

What is art? How can we understand it? We will look at 3 different artworks together and think about how artists tell stories using pictures instead of words, using the paintings to inspire our own creative writing.

The following taught session is offered for KS5 students:

Anthropology, Archaeology and Identity (90 minutes)

This discussion based session examines the relationship between museums and people, as well as current issues with collection, curation and repatriation. Students will learn how the collections come to the Museum and how we navigate the ethics of display and access.

A museum teacher leads the first 45 minutes of the session. Students then independently investigate the galleries and conduct their own object research.

Museum of Me (60 minutes)

What is the role of museums in society? How should museums use objects to represent other cultures? How do objects help construct and display identity? These are some of the questions that frame this cross-cultural gallery-taught session, which combines critical thinking, self-reflection, discussion, looking and object handling activities.

Ancient Maya (90 minutes)

How did the ancient Maya express their identity? What objects did they use to show their power? What can archaeology tell us about Maya life? These are some of the questions we will discuss while students learn how to read a Maya monument and handle objects from Central and South America.

This PowerPoint has been created for teachers to deliver a school-based session focused on the enigmatic Red Deer antler headdress from the world renowned site of Star Carr in Yorkshire, England. Dating from the Mesolithic, this 11,000 year old object is thought to be linked to shamanic practices performed millennia ago along the edges fo a watery environment. View the PowerPoint

 

Visit our website for more details and teacher's resources

A session tracing life in Britain from the Palaeolithic to the Iron Age. Find out what distinguishes each epoch and how everyday objects changed through time and space. View the Powerpoint

 

Visit our website for more details and teacher's resources.

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