This kit contains all the material you will need to make paint using pigments and a medium just as artists did (before ready-mix paint!). You can construct an experiment for students to explore the role of science in both the artist’s and the scientist’s workshop with reference to the technical analysis of the Renaissance painting, Cupid and Psyche by Jacopo del Sellaio. There is material provided with the kit that supports each of the suggested activities below.

Suggested activities

About the Session 

This set of activities uses objects from the Whipple Museum to explore:

Links between art and science

Microscopes

Telescopes 

Reflection and refraction

Optical illusions and how they work 

Duration: Can be booked as: 

A 60-minute outreach session (online or in person) with ideas for experiments to complete in class

or

Museum Trails

If you are visiting the Museum with young children, why not download our Rainbow of Colour trail to print out and bring with you? It will keep the children entertained as they look for all the colourful specimens in the Museum, and they can even use it in the garden or any outdoor space too.

 

Early Years

Resources for Early Years pupils to aid exploration of the natural world

Key Stage 1

Resources suitable for pupils in Year 1 and Year 2

Ancient Maya (90 minutes)

How did the ancient Maya express their identity? What objects did they use to show their power? What can archaeology tell us about Maya life? These are some of the questions we will discuss while students learn how to read a Maya monument and handle objects from Central and South America.

To make your zine you will need:

  • a sheet of paper
  • coloured pencils or pens
  • coloured paper
  • some glue
  • fossils, rocks, pebbles for inspiration
Download the zine folding instructions and watch the video below

 

It might not look very exciting but flint gravel has a story to tell of a warm chalky sea that covered a lot of England about 90 million years ago. That’s when dinosaur were around although they were not living in this particular sea. Sometimes flint filles the holes made by borrowing animals and sometimes, if we’re lucky it enclosed the remains of sea creatures meaning it is great place to look for fossils.

Scientists use all sorts of different ways to name the new plants, animals and fossils they find.

Two parts - Scientific names usually have two parts, just as people have a first name and a family name.

Latin or Ancient Greek - Often the names use words from Latin or Ancient Greek.

Learn more about Greek Pottery using vase templates and sherds from the Museum's collection to design your own vase.

Choose one of three pottery shapes then draw and decorate your own vase inspired by Greek pottery. 

Download a Greek Pottery guide to use as inspiration for your pot decoration

Download a template of Greek vase shapes

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