Early Years

Resources for Early Years pupils to aid exploration of the natural world

Key Stage 1

Resources suitable for pupils in Year 1 and Year 2

Extreme Environments (90 minutes)

How have people adapted to extreme environments such as deserts, jungles or polar regions? How do these environments impact their way of life and culture? These are some of the questions students will think about as they look at and handle objects from around the world.

To make your zine you will need:

  • a sheet of paper
  • coloured pencils or pens
  • coloured paper
  • some glue
  • fossils, rocks, pebbles for inspiration
Download the zine folding instructions and watch the video below

 

This PowerPoint has been created for teachers to deliver a school-based session focused on the enigmatic Red Deer antler headdress from the world renowned site of Star Carr in Yorkshire, England. Dating from the Mesolithic, this 11,000 year old object is thought to be linked to shamanic practices performed millennia ago along the edges fo a watery environment. View the PowerPoint

 

Visit our website for more details and teacher's resources

A session tracing life in Britain from the Palaeolithic to the Iron Age. Find out what distinguishes each epoch and how everyday objects changed through time and space. View the Powerpoint

 

Visit our website for more details and teacher's resources.

An adaptation is when part of the body becomes specialised for a certain function that means the animal has a better chance of survival in a particular environment.

The Wonderchicken research team have put together a craft activity and information sheets about different types of bird and how they have adapted to the environment they live in.

You will need:

How did the ancient Maya express their identity? What objects did they use to show their power? What can archaeology tell us about Maya life? These are some of the questions we will discuss while students learn how to read a Maya monument and handle objects from Central and South America.

It might not look very exciting but flint gravel has a story to tell of a warm chalky sea that covered a lot of England about 90 million years ago. That’s when dinosaur were around although they were not living in this particular sea. Sometimes flint filles the holes made by borrowing animals and sometimes, if we’re lucky it enclosed the remains of sea creatures meaning it is great place to look for fossils.

Scientists use all sorts of different ways to name the new plants, animals and fossils they find.

Two parts - Scientific names usually have two parts, just as people have a first name and a family name.

Latin or Ancient Greek - Often the names use words from Latin or Ancient Greek.

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